Every Time I Read Stefan Zweig, Every Time I Listen to Farid Farjad

I love this writer-musician duo.

Some people like to listen to music while reading books. I am one of these people. I have kinds of music that I associate with the books I read. When I read those books, I want to listen to that music. I feel like I need to listen to that music from somewhere deep down. When I read that book, If I listen to that music, I feel like I’m part of that novel.

Of course, in the books, stories, or novels we read, We feel like we’re there. If it doesn’t happen that way, we don’t taste what we read, and we get tired of the novel we can move forward in a very short time.

I also have a writer whose books I read in this form. He writes more stories. I like to read some of his stories in a day, maybe two hours, and some of his stories for days. And when I read it all, I have a list that plays with it. There are some exit points in the stories. I also feel a very different world when it accompanies the music in the background at those exit points that deeply affect a person, think about the conditions of that era, say Wow.

Now I want to tell you about the author of the novels, one of this duo of novels and music.

After giving a very brief account of his life, I want to list his novels. And then I’ll tell you about the music I’ve associated with.

Stefan Zweig

He was born on 28 November 1881 in Austria-Hungary of Jewish descent. I know him through his novels and stories. After reading his biography, I found out that he was a novelist, journalist, playwright, and biographer. During his period, his books were one of the most translated and most popular authors. In 1933, most of the books of Jewish writers were burned, and one of them was Stefan Zweig.

I don’t like to comment on other people’s lives. I wonder what conditions they were living under at that time. But from his novels, the terms of the era are clear. Religion, language, race, as well as noble, degenerate discrimination against people, and dozens more, actually gave ideas to readers, that is, me. When I think about those periods, Stefan Zweig was probably just one of the millions of people who committed suicide at that time.
I want to thank him endlessly for leaving such beautiful works. Each story has a different character, different environments, different lifestyles, and very different dreams. Sometimes I think about how you have ideas about dozens of things. Because it surprises me.
For example, in a novel, he talks about a girl. This girl is cowardly, timid, but beautiful enough to be portrayed. He’s away from his family, and they’re all being slaughtered during a war. They give a baby in the hands of this girl, who is devoid of a sense of motherhood, at first she is afraid of the baby, and towards the end, the baby becomes a part of her, and her feelings of motherhood, femininity is revealed. I’m very impressed with this story. If I read it again, I’ll read it with the same feeling.

Stefan Zweig- The Miracles of Life, 1903

The musician I listened to reading these masterpieces is Farid Farjad.
And now I’ll give you brief information about Farid Farjad. Farid Farjad is a US citizen of Persian descent. He’s one of the best violin virtuosos in the world. He was born in Tehran in 1938. He has been playing the violin since he was 8 years old.
He plays the violin so beautifully that normally I don’t like it when the violin sound is dominant, I don’t enjoy listening very much, but this guy is great at his job.

I want to share with you the works of these two Masters.

Stefan Zweig

  • The Miracles of Life, 1903
  • The Love of Erika Ewald, 1904
  • The Star Over the Forest, 1904
  • Fear, 1920
  • Compulsion, 1920
  • Fantastic Night, 1922
  • Letter from an Unknown Woman, 1922
  • Moonbeam Alley, 1922
  • Amok, 1922
  • The Invisible Collection, 1925
  • The Downfall of the Heart, 1927
  • Twenty-Four Hours in the Life of a Woman, 1927
  • Beware of Pity, 1939
  • Incident on Lake Geneva, 1936
  • Leporella, 1935
  • Buchmendel, 1929

Now I share with you the works of Farid Farjad, which I love most and which I associate with these novels.

Farid Farjad

  • Aylirigh
  • Golha
  • Robabeh Jan
  • Taghatam Deh
  • Ghoghaye Setaregan

I hope you guys found a piece. I love this writer-musician duo. In fact, most of the time, when I listen to Farid Farjad, I think of one of the Stefan Zweig novels. As soon as I hear the notes, I think about those times. Every time I think of a different character. I’m very happy with this situation. It’s one of the climaxes of life. I enjoy the book I read, the music I listen to helps that. I can’t replace each of them with the other. I love this writer-musician duo.

My Advices

My advice is to listen to Golha, which is the work of Farid Farjad, with the Brulant Secret of Stefan Zweig. I hope this little advice can have the same effect on you as it does on me.

My other advice is to listen to Robabeh Jan which is the work of Farid Farjad, with The Miracles of Life of Stefan Zweig. I hope this other little advice can have the same effect on you as it does on me.

My one other piece of advice is to listen to Taghatam Deh which is the work of Farid Farjad, with Fear of Stefan Zweig. I hope this other little advice can have the same effect on you as it does on me.

My one other piece of advice is to listen to Ghoghaye Setaregan which is the work of Farid Farjad, with Twenty-Four Hours in the Life of a Woman of Stefan Zweig. I hope this other little advice can have the same effect on you as it does on me.

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